Conservation of Architectural Ironwork 2-day CPD course

Event Description

What?

The long-awaited return of our popular 2-day CPD in the Conservation of Architectural Ironwork

Where?

Jacob’s Well, Holy Trinity, Micklegate, York YO1 6LE

When?

29th-30th September 2022

Who is it for?

Aimed at craft practitioners and consultative professionals, this course is an introduction to the conservation of ironwork, covering historical context, metallurgy of wrought iron and steels, traditional tools, techniques, materials, design and manufacture, with a focus on the processes of restoration, surface preparation and treatments, specification & standards for heritage ironwork contracts, including a procurement and pricing exercise.  The lectures will be complemented by a site visit to survey historic ironwork and develop a strategy for its conservation.

The IHBC (Institute of Historic Building Conservation) recognises that this NHIG programme may provide part of the compulsory CPD requirements of a Full Member.

Aims of the day

Delegates will learn the basic principles of assessing historic ironwork and making decisions about its care. Tender procedures often require the commissioner of the work to have knowledge of the medium in order to procure the best value. We aim to equip those wishing to commission work on listed ironwork with information they will find essential in the writing of specifications.

You can download the full programme HERE

Lecturers GEOFF WALLIS & BETHAN GRIFFITHS have extensive experience in the field of historic ironwork conservation. They will share their own practical experiences and will be available to discuss delegates’ own projects where appropriate.

Tickets: £250 for 2 days including lunch and refreshments on both days.

Booking Form

Event Booking

Your Details


Please give the name of the delegate if different from above.

eg Blacksmith, architect etc.

Please complete the calculation to prove you are human.

Data collected via this form will be handled in conformity with NHIG data protection policy

Back to top