Did you know…

The following are links to useful resources for anyone involved with heritage ironwork.


Eastlake and Beachell


Eastlake & Beachell have once again sponsored NHIG’s operating insurances for 2017. E&B, who have strong ties to the blacksmithing and farriers’ community, have supported NHIG in this way since its inception. Initiatives like this which help to keep our running costs low are much appreciated as they enable us to focus our resources on the areas that matter most.

Grants awarded to the NHIG


NHIG’s ongoing funding drive has resulted in a number of grants recently, including, from The Foyle Foundation towards publication of a Glossary of Ironworking Terms, and from the Lord Farrington Trust towards publishing our Colour Guidance booklet (historically, as we keep saying, ironwork was anything but black!). We are hoping to secure the rest of the funding necessary to complete these projects in the near future.  Get in touch if you’d like to be involved.

BathIRON


BathIRON has now been rescheduled for 14th-17th June 2018.  This will give us time to secure the necessary funding and make BathIRON an even better event.  We look forward to sharing this unique and spectacular event with you in 2018.

NHIG Projects


We were delighted to receive a grant from The Foyle Foundation for our ironwork Glossary project which is now in development, and from the Lord Faringdon Trust towards our  ‘Colour’ of ironwork guidance booklet. We are hoping to secure the rest of the funding necessary to kick-start this project in the near future.

Get in touch if you’d like to be involved.

Scran…


According to their website:

“Scran aims to provide educational access to digital materials representing our material culture and history. We host images, movies and sounds from museums, galleries, archives and the media and we are one of the largest educational online services in the UK supporting thousands of schools, libraries, colleges and universities.

We work in partnership with over 300 cultural institutions in Scotland and the rest of the UK. A number of institutions use our online solution – Scran-in-a-Box – to provide access to their own data. Scran is funded through grant aid from the Scottish Government, subscriptions and sales of services.”

The Scottish Ironwork Foundation…


… was set up “To promote historic architectural ironwork made or found in Scotland”

The group’s public presence is most up-to-date on their Facebook page. Unfortunately, their web-based database of Scottish ironwork was destroyed by a hacker and has not yet been rebuilt,  but you can get some information about them on their website.

Scran is another Scottish institution, a service of the Scottish charity Historic Environment Scotland.
According to their website:

“Scran aims to provide educational access to digital materials representing our material culture and history. We host images, movies and sounds from museums, galleries, archives and the media and we are one of the largest educational online services in the UK supporting thousands of schools, libraries, colleges and universities.
We work in partnership with over 300 cultural institutions in Scotland and the rest of the UK. A number of institutions use our online solution – Scran-in-a-Box – to provide access to their own data. Scran is funded through grant aid from the Scottish Government, subscriptions and sales of services.”

Did you know…


For a truly impressive and comprehensive write-up on wrought iron, Wikipedia is hard to beat!

Wrought iron and steel…


Did you know TATA Steel has an educational resource online which summarises the history of wrought iron, cast iron, steel, and the development of building technologies using each.

The information can be found here.

Paint Sample Removal


Did you know there are 101 uses for duct tape?

A tip for paint sample removal by Phil Beckwith of Topp & Co

Put duct tape over the area from which you want a sample, then tap with the round head of a ball peen hammer. Remove duct tape complete with sample of paint. If you want a neater sample, do as above, but before tapping use a Stanley knife to cut a square shape making sure to cut right down to the metal then just tap this square area before removing.

The Historical Metallurgy Society


Did you know about the range of Datasheets in PDF format available on Historical Metallurgy Society’s website?

These cover a broad range of interesting topics, from geophysical detection techniques to the old methods of working and refining various metals – including our favourite, iron.